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Peaceful Heart Cheese

Peaceful Heart Cheese

peaceful heart cheese

We made cheese again on Monday. This time we made ‘Peaceful Heart’. It is a semi-soft, washed curd cheese which makes it deliciously mild and creamy.

We will age it for around three months. The interior of the cheese has tiny holes throughout the paste. It demonstrates a creamy to yellow color. The cheese will be mild to sharp in flavor and buttery depending on how long it is aged.

We will list it on this site for taste testing in about three months so mark you calendars now if you want to have some for your Thanksgiving dinner.

More Farm Exercise

This afternoon it was time to move the animals to a new piece of pasture. As you may know, we rotationally graze our animals. That means we let them graze in one place for a few days and then move them to another. This keeps the grass from being overgrazed and our pastures in tip-top shape. It also keeps the parasite population down. There is no host and by the time the animals return to any given section of pasture, the parasites have died off.

The cows and sheep were close by where we needed to move them. The goats, however, were nearly as far back in the woods as they could get (think a quarter mile walk). Moving them out of the woods was a hazardous adventure for me due to lots of trees and old limbs on the ground. I carefully picked my way through the debris, got the goats out into the main pasture (with Scott’s help) and made my way back to more solid ground with only one slight slip and no falls.

Once they were in the open, we gently herded them to the next pasture for fresh grass. Since January we have been working to tame them. The whole lot of them were wild and very hard to manage. But with persistence and lots of treats, we have successfully brought them to the point that we can now walk within 4 or 5 feet of them. They simply trot along ahead of us, looking over their shoulder once in a while as if to seek escape if we are not paying attention.

All animals are happily munching on new grass at this moment.

Milking the Cows

We are not sure what is going on with Buttercup. For the past two days she has been reluctant to put her head through the milking stantion where she is gently held. Her daily treat is waiting there yet she is very wary. Today Scott had to get a rope around her neck and give her a long slow tug to get her to put her head through that same opening she has stood in for months.

We put a halter on her just in case she is still acting shy tomorrow. Gentleness and patience is what works for milk cows. Buttercup is an exercise in patience. She was really cute when she was young as you can see in this pic. Claire is the bigger one. Claire has no trouble going in her stanchion; I have to encourage her to leave!

That’s about it for this update. Leave your comments below or go to our Contacts page for questions and comments on other topics.