Homemade Butter

Homemade Butter

In the early days, it took a little while to get enough cream to churn, and so it was collected over various days. Because the milk in these small old-timey dairies was not refrigerated, the lactic acid bacteria inherent in dairy would ferment slightly. This cultured butter has a very tangy and rich flavor. Most butters made in Europe still taste this way, although they are made from pasteurized cream inoculated with lactic acid. Uncultured butter made from straight-up pasteurized cream is called sweet cream butter, and is what we’re used to in the United States.

Homemade Butter

At its very essence, making butter requires nothing more than agitation. What you’re doing is separating the fat from the milk. You can use a blender, a stand mixer with the whip attachment, or just shake by hand in a mason jar. For those who desire to dedicate themselves to making it regularly, you might invest in a butter churn. If you use a stand mixer, be sure to place a kitchen towel over the mixer and the bowl to stop the buttermilk from flinging all over your kitchen, which will happen when the butter globules form. The buttermilk becomes thin like water at that point.
Course: Condiment
Cuisine: American

Ingredients

  • 1 pint heavy whipping cream
  • ice water
  • salt to taste

Instructions

  • Set a pint of heavy cream out to warm to room temperature, about an hour.
  • Pour cream into your device or into a jar with a tight-fitting lid. If using a machine, turn on low speed, then raise to medium speed. If you're using a jar, start shaking (you'll need some serious elbow grease if doing it by hand).
  • First, the cream will turn into whipped cream with soft, then stiff peaks. Keep going until the cream breaks. If you’re shaking the cream by hand, you’ll hear a sloshing, then you’ll begin to feel something more solid hit the sides of the jar. If you’re using a stand mixer, you’ll see the butter clinging to the beater. This usually takes anywhere from 5 to 15 minutes or even 20 with an electric butter churn. It’s gentler. Churning by hand will take longer. In this process, you are separating the butterfat from the liquid.
  • Once the butter has solidified, pour off the buttermilk and save it for baking (or drink it!). Scoop the butter into a bowl. Rinse the butter by pouring ice water over it and pressing the remaining buttermilk out with a small spatula or a spoon. Pour off the water and repeat the process. Keep rinsing and squishing the butter with the ice water until the water runs clear.
  • Add some salt if you like and work that through the butter.

Notes

Butter freezes really well.
What makes butter yellow? It is the beta carotene that creates the yellow in cow milk. Butter made from our Normande cows’ milk is an even deeper yellow than butter from the grocery store. The reason is a combination of the richness of our Normande cow’s cream and their 100% pasture-based diet.

Mary Randolph’s Cornmeal Bread

Mary Randolph’s Cornmeal Bread

An old fashioned cornbread recipe.

“Rub a piece of butter the size of an egg into a pint of cornmeal, make a batter with two eggs and some new milk, add a spoonful of yeast, set it by the fire an hour to rise, butter little pans and bake it.” Mary Randolph.

Cornmeal Bread

Course: Accompaniment
Cuisine: American

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons butter melted
  • 2 cups milk
  • 2 cups white corn meal
  • 2 teaspoons dried yeast
  • 2 eggs

Instructions

On the Hearth

  • 1. Heat butter and milk until milk is warm and butter begins to melt. Set aside to cool to lukewarm.
  • 2. Combine cornmeal, yeast, and salt in bowl. Stir in cooled milk and butter.
  • 3. Beat eggs lightly and stir into rest of ingredients. Blend well but do not overmix.
  • 4. Pour into well-greased baking pan and set aside to rise one hour.
  • 5. Carefully place filled pan in preheated Dutch oven on trivet or rocks. Bake, following general instructions for Dutch oven baking, for about 25 minutes, or until knife inserted in center comes out clean and bread is a rich golden brown.

Modern Method

  • 1. Follow hearth directions one through four, using 8” x 8” square pan.
  • 2. Preheat oven to 450°F. Bake cornbread 20 to 30 minutes or until done.

Crème Fraîche

Crème Fraîche

Crème fraîche is similar to sour cream. While sour cream and crème fraîche are both used to add richness and tangy flavor, they are not the same thing. And is it worth taking the extra time to make your own crème fraîche? I’m going to say absolutely, yes, depending on the use.

Use it anywhere you would use sour cream. Because sour cream has less fat but more protein, simmering or boiling it will result in curdling. Crème fraîche is a better choice for sauces or soups.

Crème Fraîche

In France, crème fraîche was traditionally made from unpasteurized cream that naturally contained the right bacteria to thicken it. Since our cream is pasteurized here in the US, this crème fraîche is made by adding a fermenting agent with bacteria to heavy cream.
Prep Time5 mins
Total Time2 d 5 mins
Course: Condiment
Cuisine: French

Ingredients

  • 2 cups heavy cream
  • 3 tablespoons cultured buttermilk

Instructions

  • In a glass jar, combine the buttermilk with the heavy cream.
  • Cover the jar tightly with cheesecloth or other breathable material. Let sit at room temperature (70 to 75 degrees) for 24 hours.
  • Remove cloth, stir. It will be thick but will get thicker. Screw on a lid, and refrigerate for another 24 hours before using.

Cheese Fondue

Cheese Fondue

This classic family and friends traditional favorite is easy to make. There is nothing more cozy than a communal meal with loved ones. Enjoy!

Cheese Fondue

Classic cheese fondue. Cheese and white wine are the center pieces of the dish. Beer or broth can be substituted for another occasion. The list of fondue dippers is endless. I've included a substantial list, but feel free to try anything that goes with cheese.
Prep Time10 mins
Cook Time15 mins
Total Time25 mins
Course: Appetizer
Cuisine: American
Servings: 6 servings

Ingredients

What You Need - For the Fondue

  • 2 cups Pinnacle Cheese or any alpine cheese (gruyere, emmental, appenzeller)
  • 2 cups Clau d' ville Cheddar Cheese or other cheddar cheese
  • 2 tablespoons cornstarch
  • 1 cup dry white wine Sauvignon Blanc
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • 1 clove garlic minced
  • 1 tablespoon Kirsch or other brandy
  • 1/4 teaspoon nutmeg ground
  • 1 teaspoon dijon mustard optional

What You Need - For Dipping

  • bread pieces french or sourdough in 1" cubes
  • apples 1" cubes
  • cherry or grape tomatoes
  • broccoli steamed
  • new potatoes roasted
  • mushrooms

Game Day Delights - For Dipping

  • potato chips
  • tortilla chips
  • soft or hard pretzels
  • bacon not too crisp or it will break off in the pot
  • ham, turkey or beef
  • kielbasa or italian sausage
  • meatballs
  • hotdogs 1" slices
  • pickles

Instructions

  • Grate the cheeses. Combine the cheese with the cornstarch. Toss together until all of the cheese is thoroughly coated
  • On the stove over medium-low heat, bring the wine, lemon and garlic to a simmer. Add the cheese to the simmering liquid a little at a time. Sir well between each additional to ensure a smooth fondue.
  • Once smooth, add the brandy, nutmeg and mustard. Carefully pour the fondue into a fondue pot. Serve with fondue forks or wooden skewers.

Notes

You can also use a crock pot. For that method mix the cheese with the cornstarch and coat well. Then simply add all of the ingredients to the pot and let it heat slowly, stirring often.

Lemon Cheese

Lemon Cheese

Lemon cheese is a very simple fresh cheese that you can easily make in your kitchen. It is a moist spreadable cheese with a hint of lemon taste.

If you make it in the evening, this rich and delicious cheese will be ready to spread on hot biscuits, toast, muffins, bagels or croissants for breakfast in the morning!

Lemon Cheese

Lemon cheese is a very simple fresh cheese that you can easily make in your kitchen. It is a moist spreadable cheese with a hint of lemon taste.  
Course: Accompaniment, Condiment
Cuisine: American

Ingredients

  • 1 gallon milk do not use ultra-pasteurized, it will not set up.
  • 2 large lemons or 1/4 cup lemon juice
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt

Instructions

  • Warm milk to 165 F, stirring often to prevent scorching.
  • Add lemon juice. Stir and set aside for 15 minutes. The warm milk will separate into a stringy curd and a greenish liquid whey. It should be clear, not milky.
  • Line a colander with butter muslin. Pour the curds and whey into the colander. Tie the corners of the cheesecloth into a knot and hang the bag of curds to drain. After an hour, check for the desired consistency. Think cream cheese.
  • Remove the cheese from the cloth and place it in a bowl. Add salt to taste, usually 1/4 tsp. You may mix in herbs. Fresh dill comes to mind.
  • Place cheese in a covered container and store in the refrigerator. It will keep for a week, perhaps a little more.

Notes

  1. You may go up to 190 F to help your milk coagulate.
  2. You may add more lemon juice if your milk doesn't coagulate.

Bone Broth

Bone Broth

Bone broth is made with bones that have bits of meat still clinging unlike “stock”. It is also generally thinner than “stock”. Most people use the terms interchangeably.  It has been made for centuries. Roasted bones will add flavor to the broth and will darken the color. Bone broth is now a popular health food. Try it?

I am pleased to bring you this recipe that includes fresh herbs for an added bit of flair.

Bone Broth

Homemade lamb broth with herbs. Use it to reduce inflammation and add strength to joints. Make a larger batch by doubling, tripling or quadrupling the ingredients. Store the extra frozen or pressure can it for even longer shelf life. Use it as a nutritious hot beverage or add it to your soups and stews.
Prep Time10 mins
Cook Time8 hrs
Total Time8 hrs 10 mins
Course: Beverage
Cuisine: American
Servings: 4 servings

Ingredients

  • 1 pound lamb bones or other bone of our choice
  • 1 tablespoon cooking oil
  • 1 large onion diced
  • 3 medium carrots chunked
  • 3 stalks celery chopped
  • 3 sprigs rosemary fresh
  • 5 sprigs thyme fresh
  • 3 gallons water more as needed
  • salt optional

Instructions

  • Preheat oven to 400 F.
  • Place bones in roasting pan. Cook for 30-40 minutes or until browned.
  • In a large stock pot placed over medium heat, add cooking oil.
  • Add onion, carrot, celery, garlic, and herbs. Saute for 5 minutes.
  • Add bones including fat and juices from the roasting pan.
  • Add enough water to cover the bones and bring it to a simmer. Reduce the heat to low.
  • Simmer for 8 hours (or up to 24 hours) uncovered. Add more water as needed to keep the bones covered.
  • Strain the broth through a fine mesh strainer lined with a tea towel.
  • Enjoy hot or store in the refrigerator for up to a week.

Notes

If you made a larger amount, freeze the remaining broth in container sizes that fit your everyday needs or pressure can for longer term storage.

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